Why I chose Squarespace over every other website building option

Here’s the scenario: You have spent months trying to make your business the best it can be. Defining your mission and vision statement, figuring out your ideal demographic, and finding a unique spin that makes your business stand out against your competition.

You have made such great progress and now you want to share it with the world. So, naturally you go to google and search “how to create a website for your business.” Three hundred million blogs, ads, and websites pop up telling you which one is best and you suddenly are all too overwhelmed and say to yourself, “I can’t do this! There are just too many options! Won’t somebody just tell me which one I should go with?” (I know you probably weren’t that dramatic in real life, but go with it because it sets up my next statement perfectly)

 Well, folks, that’s what I wrote this post for. (Nailed it)

Why I Chose Squarespace.png

1. I’m too dumb for Wordpress.

 

When I was looking for web hosting I was looking through at least 1% of those three hundred million I mentioned earlier. Ok, probably only like 0.0000001%, but who’s counting. Anyway, like you, I was overwhelmed so I set sail through the vastness that is the internet and read through some blog posts of people I already followed along with and trusted (i.e. Melyssa Griffin known then as “The Nectar Collective,” and Dale Partridge who created Startupcamp.com (both of which are worth checking out)). I learned from them that wordpress.org was the industry standard and that if you didn’t use this you were a fool. So I tried.

I say I tried, because I had every intention on learning this thing and making it work for my potential business at the time. I was working at a coffee shop part-time and working on my new biz the other part, so I knew I had time to adjust to the learning curve required and I was ready to take it head on.

It was less than thirty minutes in. I had downloaded the software and the PDF guide that tells you what to do. Evidently I do not speak the language of wordpress. I had never built a website before or anything like it. I had only used graphic design products like Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop. I was a newbie and it showed. I tried making sense of it, I asked my beautiful more-intelligent-than-me wife to see if she understood it (If she had spent even some time with it she would have figured it out. She always does.) but she didn’t understand it, and so I threw in the towel.

You’re probably thinking, “Wow, Tyler, you didn’t try very hard.” And you know what, I didn’t. I gave up, threw a tantrum, and screamed “I HATE THIS!” like the little boy I am inside.* I decided Wordpress was over my head and there had to be something else out there that was better for me.

That’s when I discovered Squarespace

*Disclaimer: that was a hyperbole, that didn’t actually happen. Also, I believe wordpress is still one of the best web hosting sites out there. If you have the brains and the willpower to figure it out, which I know you do, then go learn how to use it. But if not, continue reading about "Squarespace: The website that changed everything." (Not their slogan)

 

2. Squarespace is #1 (not a statistic, just an opinion)

 

At the time when I first decided to use Squarespace they were doing the best job within the template-based website builders as far as I could tell. This was when they only had like 9 templates to choose from (I think this was within their first year or two of being a business so you can basically say that I knew Squarespace before they were cool. So hipster of me). Ok, so I just looked it up, and they launched in 2004. Which means that I am full of crap and need to do more research before I go assuming these kinds of things, but in my defense, at the time I had been hearing a low buzz of this new website builder called Squarespace and it made me feel like I was walking into something new (even though it was apparently ten years old at the time).

 

This was obviously about four years ago when I was making the decision to create a website for my potential business at the time, “Ransom Creative” (it never came to fruition unfortunately, but check out that bad ass logo to the right) and as I looked through my options, Wordpress.org (too hard), Wordpress.com or Weebly or GoDaddy Web Builder (cheesy templates and limited customization), and Wix.com (seemed new to the game and not quite with it), I decided that Squarespace was going to be the best bang for my buck and the best choice for what I wanted to accomplish with my business.

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3. It is very user friendly

 

 

Squarespace’s templates were so clean, hip, modern, and from what I could tell a much better option than their competition. Not only was the aesthetic super pleasing to the eye (an important thing to a freelance graphic designer), but the user interface was super easy to use once you get the hang of how it all works. To be honest it took me probably a full day to understand their specific way of block adding options, but once I figured it out I never wanted to try anything else. It makes sense 90% of the time ( of course there’s always going to be a time where you run into something where you have a problem to solve), but it obviously made more sense to me much quicker than Wordpress did. So, that’s why I continued with the process.

Squarespace has been perfect for me as freelance graphic designer and blogger. I don’t need a bunch of flashy features on my website like a big company like Target or REI might. I just need people to know who I am, what I do, and how I can help them and "by George" Squarespace is the perfect tool for exactly that. And better yet, I am fully capable of creating my own site and don’t need to hire an expensive web developer or designer (if you do need this, there is no shame in it, in fact I encourage it. If you feel like you need a professional to take care of your website, hire them.)

Squarespace is also perfect for my clients. I have a unique process (check it out here) where I design a businesses brand and a Squarespace website in two weeks. And because Squarespace does a free two week trial (to allow their users to get in touch with the software and see if they like it) it works out perfectly for me and my clients. Also at the end of the two weeks I hand off the newly created website over to my clients. Because of the ease of the user interface, I hand it off with full confidence that my clients can maintain their new website and not get too overwhelmed. Not to mention (I actually am going to mention) that when I create a website and hand it off to my client, I still contain admin capabilities to editing the site which makes it super easy to make changes down the road if the client needs it.

 

    To sum it all up in one sentence: I’m dumb, I’m lazy, and, in this case, I judged a book (website builder) by it’s cover (overall aesthetic). That’s why Squarespace is best for me. It fills the void of those three negative traits I have developed over time and ends up making me a better person and running a better business.

    As a disclaimer, I do believe that all said competition stated above have upped their game over the past few years and are worth researching and comparing to Squarespace in order to find what works best for you. Ultimately this post is just why I chose Squarespace not a post to try and convince you to choose something that might not work for you. I want you to find what is best for what you need and hopefully laying out my two cents might help you narrow down your choice out of the infinite possibilities.

    Go out and find what you need in a website and consider all the benefits Squarespace has to offer.

    Let me know what you think or ask any question in the comments below. You can use these questions as a prompt: What web building platform do you use and why? What kind of problems do you run into with your website?

Some Squarespace resources:

Squarespace Help

Elle and Company

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